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Sandra Day O'Connor has dementia


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#41 wiffleball

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 12:45 AM

Slap fight aside..


In my patientologist experience, the thing unsaid about dementia is that it's a lot like drinking; It doesn't cause you to do that which is diametrically opposite of whom you are, it merely removes the filters.

Obviously varies. But all these well-meaning idiots who run around saying it's the disease! No, I knew her for 50 years, it's not just the disease.

Again , can vary.
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#42 BunnysBastatrds

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 12:45 AM

You have no idea, and its just an opinion anyway. Relax, cirrhosis aint a bad way to go.


I have more than a valid opinion on dementia. I've watched my mother and aunt suffer for years with it. You seem to know everything about every disease known to mankind. How do you do it?

All my flavors are guranteed to satisfy.


#43 shorepatrol

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 12:55 AM

I have more than a valid opinion on dementia. I've watched my mother and aunt suffer for years with it. You seem to know everything about every disease known to mankind. How do you do it?

Fock that clown bunny. 



#44 SenatorRock

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 01:10 AM

I seem to recall hearing that there are some ways of preventing dementia but I don't remember the specifics.

CBD oil? ACV? Paleo diet?

#45 SenatorRock

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 01:12 AM

Ruh roh.

Half of all Alzheimer's patients have herpes.

https://www.dailymai...s_campaign=1490

#46 penultimatestraw

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 03:40 AM

I'd embarrass your hospitalist azz on the floor and critical care aspect of resp care  

Oh I get it. You're one of those RTs who think they know more than the doctors. I'm sure there's a ton of learnin' in your 2 year training, much more than med school, residency, fellowship, etc. That's why respiratory therapy is so competitive  :rolleyes:

 

Stick with suctioning and STFU.



#47 penultimatestraw

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 03:46 AM

I have more than a valid opinion on dementia. I've watched my mother and aunt suffer for years with it. You seem to know everything about every disease known to mankind. How do you do it?

My grandmother, whom I lived with and cared for, had it too. And my work entails a lot of elderly patients, many of whom are demented.

 

I'm not saying your opinion is invalid. I'm saying you haven't seen as many sick people with other illnesses to declare dementia the worst of the worst. I wouldn't tell you I know more about insurance claims or drinking, so why in the world would you think you have a better understanding of my profession than me?



#48 penultimatestraw

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 03:48 AM

Fock that clown bunny. 

Sounds like you need a smoke break. 



#49 penultimatestraw

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 03:51 AM

I seem to recall hearing that there are some ways of preventing dementia but I don't remember the specifics.

CBD oil? ACV? Paleo diet?

Not much, and certainly none of the things you listed. Coffee has some data, and there are sh!tty studies which suggest keeping your mind engaged can stave it off.

 

Eating a healthy diet and regularly exercising helps too - not Alzheimers as much as multi-infarct dementia.



#50 drobeski

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 04:49 AM

You seem to be a specialist in everyfockingthing.  :lol:

He has a PHD in douchebaggery

#51 Vince44

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 08:48 AM

I could only imagine that losing a parent to Alzheimer's is much more heartbreaking than watching them go in any other possible way. You as the son or daughter watching your father or mother lose their greatest memories, with all things that enriched their lives, and they become a shell of a person. And even that shell of a person dies. You have the front row seat to seeing all those years collapsing in on them, and not being able to even recognize you at a certain point. That's no way for someone to go out in life. The patient is suffering from the disease, but the toll it takes on the family is worse. The great amount of stress it's puts on the family must be unbearable, whom are doing anything they can to get through the next day/visit. I feel bad for anyone that has had to experience this awful thing.

#52 wiffleball

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 09:08 AM

For anybody who really cares to know, ignore all the stupid advice about diet or supplements or what not. Worthless.

If you want real practical advice, here it is. Make sure your loved one stays up to date on audio and visual devices. Meaning, upgrade their prescriptions as often as necessary. Get them into the doctor at least twice a year.

Studies and just plain Common Sense have shown that folks who can't see or hear as well tend to collapse onto themselves. They interact less they receive less stimuli, they engaged less and early onset can be a byproduct.

definitely provide as much social interaction as possible. Study after study shows that isolation even on younger Minds has a serious deleterious effect on the physiology of the brain.

And last, as odd as it may seem, be constantly on the lookout for the signs and symptoms of urinary tract infection. UTIs make people with pending or existing neurological conditions far worse than healthy people with UTIs.

I'm reluctant to recommend this last one, just because it's hard to get a loved one to do this. But if you can, get your loved one into a neurologist at least twice a year. They can administer or at least recommend certain tests that will establish a Baseline. With that, you can track the progress of any neurological deficits.

The problem is, most people are rightfully scared of even the word Alzheimer's or dementia. They really don't want the sign up for such a test. but if you can frame it in such a way as 2 get them thinking that this is a way to disprove deficit just as much as it is to prove, you might have a shot.

and yeah, Common Sense should tell you that if your loved one has an activity that they enjoy that engages their brain then by all means encourage them to continue.

The name of the game isn't cure. The goal is slowing down the progress. And any of the above has been proven to be helpful in that regard. But again, nothing is a Magic Bullet.
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#53 wiffleball

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 09:15 AM

Someone alluded to this earlier. One of my first questions was how the flock this somebody actually die from a neurological disorder or deficit?

The answer I was given? They literally forget how to eat and drink. Literally, muscles that we thought were automatic forget their jobs. The process of mastication, followed by the Tongue advancing food towards the esophagus, Etc becomes less and less automatic.

Side note, if someone also has COPD, then it's like trying to juggle and read Shakespeare at the same time. Coordinator when the Breathe In and Out and when to swallow food or water is a real feat for them.

Watching those that have a hard time eating was the most disgusting part for me. I'd see it in multiple patients. There are therapist like occupational therapist that can work with your loved one on the basics. Exercises that they can recommend both auditory and physical that will help in this regard. Otherwise, unable to take in enough nutrients, the body starts to shut itself down. And that often times is how one literally dies from for example Alzheimer's.
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#54 Bert

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 09:31 AM

I have more than a valid opinion on dementia. I've watched my mother and aunt suffer for years with it. You seem to know everything about every disease known to mankind. How do you do it?

It is called a God Complex.


You know we're sitting on four million pounds of fuel, one nuclear weapon and a thing that has 270,000 moving parts built by the lowest bidder. Makes you feel good, doesn't it?

#55 Bert

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 09:35 AM

Pen's hero

 


You know we're sitting on four million pounds of fuel, one nuclear weapon and a thing that has 270,000 moving parts built by the lowest bidder. Makes you feel good, doesn't it?

#56 drobeski

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 10:26 AM

I could only imagine that losing a parent to Alzheimer's is much more heartbreaking than watching them go in any other possible way. You as the son or daughter watching your father or mother lose their greatest memories, with all things that enriched their lives, and they become a shell of a person. And even that shell of a person dies. You have the front row seat to seeing all those years collapsing in on them, and not being able to even recognize you at a certain point. That's no way for someone to go out in life. The patient is suffering from the disease, but the toll it takes on the family is worse. The great amount of stress it's puts on the family must be unbearable, whom are doing anything they can to get through the next day/visit. I feel bad for anyone that has had to experience this awful thing. 

large font usage is one of the first signs

#57 TimmySmith

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 11:52 AM

My biggest fear...dementia...god...everytime I cant remember someones name i have a small panic attack...here it comes...

No sh1t.  I spend half my life looking for the car keys, hoping I'll find them.  I guess when I don't, I can't drive anymore.   :dunno:


“We’ve fulfilled far more promises than we’ve promised,” the president said. “I call it promises plus.”

 


#58 penultimatestraw

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 01:55 PM

For anybody who really cares to know, ignore all the stupid advice about diet or supplements or what not. Worthless.

If you want real practical advice, here it is. Make sure your loved one stays up to date on audio and visual devices. Meaning, upgrade their prescriptions as often as necessary. Get them into the doctor at least twice a year.

Studies and just plain Common Sense have shown that folks who can't see or hear as well tend to collapse onto themselves. They interact less they receive less stimuli, they engaged less and early onset can be a byproduct.

definitely provide as much social interaction as possible. Study after study shows that isolation even on younger Minds has a serious deleterious effect on the physiology of the brain.

And last, as odd as it may seem, be constantly on the lookout for the signs and symptoms of urinary tract infection. UTIs make people with pending or existing neurological conditions far worse than healthy people with UTIs.

I'm reluctant to recommend this last one, just because it's hard to get a loved one to do this. But if you can, get your loved one into a neurologist at least twice a year. They can administer or at least recommend certain tests that will establish a Baseline. With that, you can track the progress of any neurological deficits.

The problem is, most people are rightfully scared of even the word Alzheimer's or dementia. They really don't want the sign up for such a test. but if you can frame it in such a way as 2 get them thinking that this is a way to disprove deficit just as much as it is to prove, you might have a shot.

and yeah, Common Sense should tell you that if your loved one has an activity that they enjoy that engages their brain then by all means encourage them to continue.

The name of the game isn't cure. The goal is slowing down the progress. And any of the above has been proven to be helpful in that regard. But again, nothing is a Magic Bullet.

Aside from poo-pooing the other posts, this is good general advice. Even if none of it staves off dementia it will improve the elder's quality of life. Be careful about possible UTIs though, as they are frequently misdiagnosed and lead to a bunch of unnecessary antibiotics prescriptions.



#59 penultimatestraw

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 01:57 PM

Someone alluded to this earlier. One of my first questions was how the flock this somebody actually die from a neurological disorder or deficit?

The answer I was given? They literally forget how to eat and drink. Literally, muscles that we thought were automatic forget their jobs. The process of mastication, followed by the Tongue advancing food towards the esophagus, Etc becomes less and less automatic.

Side note, if someone also has COPD, then it's like trying to juggle and read Shakespeare at the same time. Coordinator when the Breathe In and Out and when to swallow food or water is a real feat for them.

Watching those that have a hard time eating was the most disgusting part for me. I'd see it in multiple patients. There are therapist like occupational therapist that can work with your loved one on the basics. Exercises that they can recommend both auditory and physical that will help in this regard. Otherwise, unable to take in enough nutrients, the body starts to shut itself down. And that often times is how one literally dies from for example Alzheimer's.

And it doesn't get better if you put in a feeding tube...this is one of the cruelest things we do to people with dementia. 



#60 penultimatestraw

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 01:59 PM

It is called a God Complex.

Again, I don't act like I know more about taxes, or whatever it is that you do.  :dunno:



#61 Vince44

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 02:27 PM

large font usage is one of the first signs


Fixed.

I'm not sure how that happened.

#62 wiffleball

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 02:45 PM

Fixed.

I'm not sure how that happened.


Dementia is funner if you write about it in Comic Sans.
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