Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Cdub100

Coaching little league

Recommended Posts

On 6/9/2019 at 1:20 PM, Hardcore troubadour said:

I played in organized leagues and pick up games. I think you're off on this one. I think it's all these travel teams that are the problem. When I was growing up the rec league was dominant and there was only one travel team in town, for the best players. It seems now that rec leagues are ignored and there are numerous travel teams now. 

I think you're way off.

Baseball was loved in this nation until little league took hold.  Its not a coincidence.  As I said, little league turned a fun pastime that kids loved into a chore.

You should appreciate freedom more.  It is essential for a kids development to organize and create their own activities without parental guidance.  If they can learn that, then it goes a long way to understanding the value of freedom.  If you take that opportunity for development away and replace it with an organized league run by adults, you teach them a very different lesson which is that the state or government should run everything.

You're basically teaching them to be communists here. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, riversco said:

I think you're way off.

Baseball was loved in this nation until little league took hold.  Its not a coincidence.  As I said, little league turned a fun pastime that kids loved into a chore.

You should appreciate freedom more.  It is essential for a kids development to organize and create their own activities without parental guidance.  If they can learn that, then it goes a long way to understanding the value of freedom.  If you take that opportunity for development away and replace it with an organized league run by adults, you teach them a very different lesson which is that the state or government should run everything.

You're basically teaching them to be communists here. 

Now you're off the deep end.  Little League isn't communist.  Kids like to play baseball on the sandlot, but they also like playing an a real team, with umpires, coaches, scoreboards, uniforms and concession stands.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, vuduchile said:

I was listening to a podcast awhile back about a study of MLB players and pitch recognition.  Their conclusion was that pitch recognition was mostly bullsh!t. Many good hitters hit well because they sit on certain pitches, guess correctly, make the pitcher work, learn his pre-delivery tendencies and win the chess game at the plate.  They also understand that a 95 mph fastball behaves like 98 or 99 depending on location.  Some players claim they can see spin , or read seams, while others admit they can't.  

I'll look for the podcast, but here are some articles with a similar slant.  

https://projects.seattletimes.com/2017/mariners-preview/science/

https://blogs.fangraphs.com/what-can-hitters-actually-see-out-of-a-pitchers-hand/

 

That’s important for spotting a fastball, which might be the most important thing a batter can do. For Machado, it’s the only thing he can do. “I don’t pick any of that stuff up,” he laughed. “I see fastball, I swing. You know how fast the pitcher can throw, so you can see it coming out of his hand. If it’s coming in hot, I’ll swing at it. I can’t tell out of the hand if it’s going to be a slider or a changeup.”

He’s not alone. Oakland’s Khris Davis could see some spin, but focused more on targeting fastballs and spotting location. “You can see some location early, too,” he said, pointing out that the angle of the hand and the ball coming out could tell him if the ball would be up or down. “I like to look for release location,” he added. “Lots of guys have different release points. Some hide it better than others.”

MVP candidate Mookie Betts:

“I don’t really know what I see. I see this white thing coming, and I somehow try to read it. I try to look at a window where his slot is and try to pick it up as fast as possible. You try to read spin, but the way I do it, I have no idea.”

Edwin Encarnacion:

“I just see the ball, it’s white or red, but I try not to think, and I don’t want to start thinking.”

Panik:

“It’s hard to talk about.”

Astros hitting coach Dave Hudgens:

“I know when a hitter is locked in, or in the zone, nothing is in their mind and everything slows down.”

Coach Ochart:

“Some of the best hitters I’ve ever coached will “black out” when they hit. Very interesting. I’ll ask them what pitch they hit, or what location the pitch was, and they won’t remember. ‘Idk coach, I just see ball, hit ball.'”

That pretty much boils down to: "you either have it or you don't".  Hand-eye coordination is where it's at.  You need to develop that, and early... or just be talented.  Guys like Encarnacion and Davis are the example of guys who "have it", but never really developed it - they're naturally talented.  Why do I say that?  They're not good "hitters".  They can drive the ball, and that's about it.  All power.  Guys who are able to harness and develop that talent are the gifted ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, vuduchile said:

Now you're off the deep end.  Little League isn't communist.  Kids like to play baseball on the sandlot, but they also like playing an a real team, with umpires, coaches, scoreboards, uniforms and concession stands.  

Exactly this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Patriotsfatboy1 said:

That can change.  Both of my kids had challenges with their skills in youth sports, but turned out ok.  My oldest played baseball in HS.  My youngest was a bench warmer when he first played football and eventually became a started.  Kids mature at different rates.  Just be supportive and keep teaching.

Oh I totally agree but he has to want to get better. He hates to practice but loves playing the game. He's going to learn pretty quick here in order to play he has to get better,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Cdub100 said:

Oh I totally agree but he has to want to get better. He hates to practice but loves playing the game. He's going to learn pretty quick here in order to play he has to get better,

Just play catch with him.  If you guys can have fun doing that, you can eventually work some footwork and fielding drills in.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, vuduchile said:

Just play catch with him.  If you guys can have fun doing that, you can eventually work some footwork and fielding drills in.  

Exactly. When I was coaching the younger kids I could tell immediately which kids had been playing catch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, vuduchile said:

Just play catch with him.  If you guys can have fun doing that, you can eventually work some footwork and fielding drills in.  

Trust me I've tried to get him to do that more but he'd rather play on the swings or do other stuff. I'll only push so hard otherwise he'll start to hate the game.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Cdub100 said:

Trust me I've tried to get him to do that more but he'd rather play on the swings or do other stuff. I'll only push so hard otherwise he'll start to hate the game.

Nothing wrong with that. Keep loving him like you do. That’s all that matters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×