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Baker Boy

Black History Month

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On 2/1/2024 at 12:59 PM, The Psychic Observer said:

Listen to him, he's white, he knows better than AAs. 🙄

Oh the irony...  521,335,632

Want to hit reply so we can make it 521,335,633?

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Ruby Bridges (1954- )

Bridges probably had no idea that the bold act she committed in 1960 would set off a chain reaction leading to the integration of schools in the South. She was just 6 years old when she became the first African American student to attend William Frantz Elementary in Louisiana at the height of desegregation. Now the Ruby Bridges Foundation exists to "inspire the next generation of leaders to end racism together one step at a time.

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Mae Jemison (1956- )

Mae Jemison isn’t just the first African American woman who orbited into space aboard the shuttle Endeavour. She's also a physician, teacher, and Peace Corps volunteer; after her work with NASA, she founded the Jemison Group, which develops scientific and technological advancements. Jemison continues to work toward helping young women of color get more involved in technology, engineering, and math careers.

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Marian Anderson (1897-1993)

Though she’s considered one of the greatest contralto singers in the world, Anderson was often denied the opportunity to show off her unique vocal range because of her race. However, in 1955, she became the first African American to perform at the Metropolitan Opera, and in 1957, she went on a 12-nation tour sponsored by the Department of State and the American National Theatre and Academy. She documented the experience in her autobiography, My Lord What a Morning. In 1963, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Her last major accomplishment before her death was receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Grammys in 1991.

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5 hours ago, Baker Boy said:

Crispus Attucks, a Black man, was the first person killed at the Boston massacre.

 

September 2020: "Some Black woman was able to stack the grocery shelf" - Joe Biden

May 2020: “You ain’t black.” - Joe Biden

August 2019: “Poor kids” just as bright as “white kids” - Joe Biden

June 2019: “The kid wearing a hoodie.” - Joe Biden

August 2012: “Put y’all back in chains” - Joe Biden

February 2007: Obama is "the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean” - Joe Biden

2006: "You can't go to a 7-Eleven or a Dunkin Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent"  - Joe Biden

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1 hour ago, Maximum Overkill said:

September 2020: "Some Black woman was able to stack the grocery shelf" - Joe Biden

May 2020: “You ain’t black.” - Joe Biden

August 2019: “Poor kids” just as bright as “white kids” - Joe Biden

June 2019: “The kid wearing a hoodie.” - Joe Biden

August 2012: “Put y’all back in chains” - Joe Biden

February 2007: Obama is "the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean” - Joe Biden

2006: "You can't go to a 7-Eleven or a Dunkin Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent"  - Joe Biden

Meh.

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Just now, Maximum Overkill said:

Meh

 

 

Responsible for 72% of the Black homicides? OK, I can buy that with no other data provided (which there wasn't).

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Rose Marie McCoy (1922-2015)

McCoy’s name may not be instantly recognizable, but she wrote and produced some of the biggest pop songs in the 1950s. In an industry dominated by white males, McCoy was able to make her mark through her pen, even if she couldn’t through her own voice. Her songs “After All” and “Gabbin’ Blues” never quite took off on the charts, but she was courted by music labels to write for other artists, including hit singles for Big Maybelle, Elvis Presley, and Big Joe Turner. So now when you hear Presley’s “Trying to Get You,” you’ll remember the name of the African American woman who wrote it.

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Tiffany Henyard 

 

Elected in February 2021 with 82% of the vote. The 8-year former village trustee Tiffany A. Henyard became the Village of Dolton’s first and youngest woman mayor in the village’s 130-year history. 

As a life-long resident of Dolton, Mayor Henyard is passionate about Dolton and continues to live in the community where she grew up. She graduated with high honors, from Thornridge High School, and earned a Bachelor of Art’s Degree in Business Administration with the highest honors, summa laude, from Robert Morris University.

 

 

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Black history month 2024

February to Date
Shot & Killed: 17
Shot & Wounded: 86
Total Shot: 103
Total Homicides: 19

Chicago Crime 2024

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Phillis Wheatley (1753-1784)

The West African–born poet spent most of her life enslaved, working for John Wheatley and his wife as a servant in the mid-1700s. Despite never having received a formal education, Wheatley became the first African American to publish a book of poems, Poems on Various Subjects. However, she died before securing a publisher for her second volume of poetry and letters. You can see the monument erected for her at the Boston Women's Memorial. In early 2023, a University at Albany professor discovered a new Wheatley poem, “On the Death of Love Rotch,” that's now considered her first full-length elegy.

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Alvin Ailey (1931-1989)

Ailey was an acclaimed dancer and choreographer who earned global recognition for his impact on modern dance. After honing his technique at the Lester Horton Dance Theater—and acting as its director after Horton passed away—Ailey wished to choreograph his own ballets and works, which differed from the traditional pieces of the time. This inspired him to start the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 1958, a multiracial troupe that provided a platform for talented Black dancers and traveled around the world. His most popular piece, "Revelations," is an ode to the Southern Black Church. Ailey died of AIDS at 58, but his company lives on in New York City.

  • Haha 1

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Ella Baker (1903-1986)

Baker was an essential activist during the civil rights movement. She was a field secretary and branch director for the NAACP and cofounded an organization that raised money to fight Jim Crow laws. Additionally, Baker was a key organizer for Martin Luther King Jr.'s Southern Christian Leadership Conference. But what was perhaps her biggest contribution to the movement was the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, which prioritized nonviolent protest, assisted in organizing the 1961 Freedom Rides, and aided in registering Black voters. The Ella Baker Center for Human Rightsexists today to carry on her legacy.

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How many trillions of dollars have been spent on teaching these people how to put focking seeds in the ground over and over and over and over and over again? 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Cdub100 said:

 

How many trillions of dollars have been spent on teaching these people how to put focking seeds in the ground over and over and over and over and over again? 

 

 

 

How old is Africa?

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5 minutes ago, Pimpadeaux said:

Turdcore and Peefoamosexual enjoying each other's company.

 

pimpledooshe's hero pinching little girl's nipples. 

 

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Benjamin O. Davis, Sr. (1877-1970)

Benjamin O. Davis, Sr., was the first Black general in the U.S. Army. He served for 50 years, beginning as a temporary first lieutenant during the Spanish American War. Throughout his service, Davis was a professor of military science at Tuskegee and Wilberforce University, commander of the 369th Infantry of the New York National Guard, and Special Assistant to the Commanding General, among other positions. He received the Bronze Star Medal and the Distinguished Service Medal and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

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Vivien Theodore Thomas (August 29, 1910[1] – November 26, 1985)[2] was an American laboratory supervisor who in the 1940s developed a procedure used to treat blue baby syndrome (now known as cyanotic heart disease).[3] He was the assistant to surgeon Alfred Blalock in Blalock's experimental animal laboratory at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, and later at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Thomas was unique in that he did not have any professional education or experience in a research laboratory; however, he served as supervisor of the surgical laboratories at Johns Hopkins for 35 years. In 1976, Johns Hopkins awarded him an honorary doctorate and named him an Instructor of Surgery for the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.[3] Without any education past high school, Thomas rose above poverty and racism to become a cardiac surgery pioneer and a teacher of operative techniques to many of the country's most prominent surgeons.

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Henrietta Lacks (1920-1951)

After being diagnosed with cervical cancer at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1951, a sample of Lacks's cancer cells were taken without her consent by a researcher. And though she succumbed to the disease at the age of 31 that same year, her cells would go on to advance medical research for years to come, as they had the unique ability to double every 20 to 24 hours. "They have been used to test the effects of radiation and poisons, to study the human genome, to learn more about how viruses work, and played a crucial role in the development of the polio vaccine," Johns Hopkins said. In 2017, Oprah starred in and executive produced HBO's The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, adapted from the book by Rebecca Skloot.

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Dr. Rebecca Lee Crumpler (1831-1895)

Rebecca Lee Crumpler was the first Black woman to earn a medical degree in the United States. After attending the prestigious Massachusetts private schoolWest-Newton English and Classical School, she worked as a nurse for eight years and applied to medical school in 1860 at the New England Female Medical College (which later merged with Boston University). She was accepted and graduated four years later. Though little is known of her career, PBS reported that she worked as a physician for the Freedman’s Bureau for the State of Virginia. She later practiced in Boston's predominantly Black neighborhood at the time, Beacon Hill, and published A Book of Medical Discourses in Two Parts.

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Ann Lowe (1898-1981)

Born in Clayton, Alabama, Ann Lowe is considered to be one of America's most influential clothing designers. She was taught to sew at an early age by her mother and grandmother—both skilled dressmakers who created clothing for wealthy white families around the state. Lowe quickly took to collecting fabric scraps, which she used to create flowers fashioned after the ones in her family's garden—patterns that later became a part of her signature designs. Her career took off after she accepted a position as an in-house gown maker in Florida, then completed design school in NYC. Lowe established a shop in Tampa, Florida, where she hired 18 seamstresses. In addition to designs that showed up in Vogue and at Academy Award shows, one of Lowe's most historical pieces of work was the wedding dress Jacqueline Bouvier wore when she married then-senator (later president) John F. Kennedy.

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Audre Lorde (1934-1992)

Audre Lorde was a lauded writer and poet known for her radical honesty and fight against racism and sexism. Self-described as a "Black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet," Lorde wrote often about the intersections of her identities. After earning both a BA from Hunter College and a masters from Columbia University, Lorde spent the 1960s working as a librarian in New York. In the 1970s she worked as a poet-in-residence at Tougaloo College in Mississippi and began publishing poetry collections. The works were informed by the intersections of race, class, and gender, and became increasingly more political. Some of her most famous works are "The Master's Tools Won't Dismantle The Master's House" and "Martha." Lorde passed away in 1992; her first full biography, Warrior Poet, was published by Alexis De Veaux in 2006.

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Gil Scott-Heron (1949-2011)

Gil Scott-Heron was a New York City–based writer, spoken word performer, poet, and musician whose 1970s songs are known for laying the groundwork for rap music. If you have heard the phrase "The revolution will not be televised," you have heard the words of Gil Scott-Heron. While both true and timeless, it's the title of Scott-Heron's poem that depicted the disconnected relationship between television/media representation and demonstrations in the street. He has been called the "godfather of rap," and his music and words have been sampled by rappers like Common and Kendrick Lamar. Even if you haven't heard of him, his work may sound more familiar than you think. One of his most famous pieces is "Whitey on the Moon" where he criticizes America's interest in space taking precedence over the well-being of African American citizens.

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