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** Round 10-16 Commentary - July PPR Mock **

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I know what Cousins did down the stretch last year was great, but his ball looks like Tannehill to me when it's flying through the air. I don't believe a qb needs a cannon to succeed, but they usually need a little more than Cousins or Tanny have. In today's game maybe it doesn't matter any more, but I still think his spectacular ending to last year was way outside of what we should expect from him.

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^ Nuts I agree that he probably regresses a little from some of those huge games, a bunch of his stats came in that game against the Saints as well, but I really like his weapons and the division he plays in.

 

I can see shootouts against the Gmen, Eagles and Cowboys.

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Went with Treadwell at my #5 WR spot. 1st round draft pick with good size, who looks to start right away. Teddy doesn't throw the deep ball well and Laquon specializes on catching short passes and making the most out of them. I see him as a 65 catch guy for 875 yards a 6-8 Td's. Playing indoors this season tells me this offense might be a bit more explosive fantasy wise.

I like the pick, but YAC is not his strong suite. That was the knock on him. He didn't muscle out defenders for someone his size and didn't make yards after the catch unless his QB made the throw to allow it. Still a great pick this late but I think he'll be more helpful in the red zone as opposed to with receptions/yardage for you.

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I like the pick, but YAC is not his strong suite. That was the knock on him. He didn't muscle out defenders for someone his size and didn't make yards after the catch unless his QB made the throw to allow it. Still a great pick this late but I think he'll be more helpful in the red zone as opposed to with receptions/yardage for you.

THE MISSING PIECE

 

The maxim that the NFL has become a passing league seems to be true. Fans may be surprised to hear that only one playoff team in 2015 had a 1,000 yard rusher. That team was the Minnesota Vikings. Ultimately, they fell short in last year’s playoffs when Blair Walsh missed a critical field goal with only seconds left. During that game, Adrian Peterson was held to 45 yards on 23 carries. With the rushing attack stymied by the stiff Seattle defense selling out to stop the run, the Vikings had no answer. The passing game was positively woeful. The leading receiver for the Vikings (Stefon Diggs) logged a paltry 26 yards through the air. A reliable primary wide receiver who could have moved the chains and provided a dominant red zone presence arguably could have given the Vikings a different outcome in that contest.

 

 

The lack of a true number one wideout was apparent not just in that game; it really hurt the Vikings all of 2015. Free agent addition Mike Wallace didn’t seem to fit with the offense. Former first-round pick Cordarrelle Patterson continued to struggle to grasp the playbook. 2014 breakout Charles Johnson suffered a rib injury early in the season and never regained his form when he did return. Fifth-round rookie Stefon Diggs surprised by earning a starting spot in his first year. He posted starter numbers for several games until opposing defenses began to pay him more attention in coverage.

 

The Vikings have built one of the better defenses in the league thanks to their defensive-minded head coach, Mike Zimmer. While the offensive line was a problem last year due to injuries, the team made great strides to improve it in the offseason by adding San Francisco’s Alex Boone and Cincinnati’s Andre Smith. Center John Sullivan also appears to be healthy, which will help to solidify this road-grading unit. As a player who can create regardless of the personnel in front of him, Adrian Peterson remains one of the best runners in the game today. All that seemed to be lacking was that number one wide receiver until…

 

With the twenty-third pick of the first round of the 2016 NFL Draft, the Vikings selected the man who will prove to be peice they’ve been missing-- Laquon Treadwell.

 

TREADWELL’S TALENTS

 

On film, we see Treadwell doing the small things that help an NFL receiver win. Among the best of his skills is his ability to release at the line-of-scrimmage. He knows how to use his hands and crisp footwork to win battles early with press corners. Playing zone against Treadwell doesn’t help, as he finds the soft spots easily and provides his quarterback with an easy completion. He is very good at tracking the ball downfield without tipping off the defender, commonly wins the ball in the air, and displays fantastic “my ball mentality.” He also gains ground after the catch by using his size and functional power to bully smaller corners, regularly breaks tackles, and keeps his balance through contact. Additionally, Treadwell is a good run blocker. While he will not primarily operate in this capacity, he can contribute on rushing downs in this way. Considering all his talents, he is more NFL ready than many rookies and should get the starting nod right away.

 

Despite what many may say, the fit with Minnesota is a good one. According to PFF, Teddy Bridgewater was the most accurate quarterback in the league last year when factoring in drops, batted passes, and throwaways. He has been hindered by not having a reliable target who can get open quickly when the offensive line has failed. The off-season acquisitions along the line should help it to hold up better and give Bridgewater more time to throw. If the line does not gel as hoped, Treadwell can stay closer-to-home and catch quick passes from Bridgewater. His work after the catch creates yards that will move the chains. If the line is much improved and Bridgewater has time, Treadwell can also do work deep. This report indicates that Bridgewater has been working hard in the offseason to improve his deep accuracy.

 

LAQUON LOSING

 

Perhaps the biggest knock on Treadwell is his lack of straight-line speed. He ran a 4.65 forty-yard dash at his pro day, a sluggish mark for prototypical receivers of his height and weight. Many are concerned that this will cause separation issues for him against NFL competition. Treadwell dropped more passes in his last collegiate year than he had in any other year. Thus, concentration drops will be an area in which he will need to focus on improving. Treadwell is also sometimes too passionate and aggressive for his own good, leading to false-start and unsportsmanlike conduct penalties. That is one problem area that will probably show up in his NFL play.

 

POSITIVES:

 

•Treadwell provides a perfect fit for the Vikings team needs.

 

 

•He wins against physical corners and is a great jump ball receiver.

 

 

•Treadwell is ready to contribute as a rookie and will probably start from game one.

 

 

NEGATIVES:

 

•Speed is not the name of Treadwell’s game. Some believe he’ll struggle to separate from corners in the NFL because he lacks it.

 

 

•Treadwell needs to improve his concentration to avoid drops.

 

 

•He was often penalized in college and could have the same problem as a pro.

 

 

FINAL THOUGHTS

 

A receiver's value is often tied to the proficiency of his quarterback. Treadwell landed with about as good of a signal caller as one could ask. He is the key to unlocking Bridgewater’s potential. In turn, Bridgewater will be able to carry them both to fantasy relevance. Don’t be surprised if Treadwell is in strong consideration for Rookie of the Year honors when the dust settles in 2016. In redraft formats, Treadwell’s current consensus ADP is pick 93, making him a late eighth-round pick. He presents great value at that point in your draft. In dynasty rookie drafts, Treadwell should be an easy candidate for the 1.02 pick, especially in non-PPR formats.

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I am thinking allen might gain touches, notably in the passing game, flacco needs a safety valve, this guy could become that tool this year

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Mckinnon is as upside as it gets this stage of the draft. I don't wish injury on players, so I hope that AP decides one day before the season starts that he is retiring for the Mckinnon stock I already own.

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A Smart guy at FFT wrote this one. His yac is fine and a plus. Dude was made, and hand selected to play in this offense with this Qb.

Source?

NFL Draft Profile – WR Laquon Treadwell
4/12/16




Editor's note: Predict the top ten picks of the NFL Draft for a chance to win FFToday prizes. Enter our NFL Draft Contest now.

Laquon Treadwell
With the skills to be a lead NFL receiver, Laquon Treadwell should go in the back half of the first round.

Vitals
College: Ole Miss
Height/Weight: 6’2”/221
Hands: 9 1/2”

Important NFL Combine Numbers
40-Yard Dash: 4.63 (Pro Day)
Vertical Jump: 33"
Broad Jump: 9' 9"
20-Yard Shuttle: DNP
3-Cone: DNP

Background (College Stats)
Rated as a five-star recruit and the nation's top receiver by multiple services, Treadwell - along with fellow draft classmate DT Robert Nkemdiche - headlined an impressive 2013 class of freshmen that put Ole Miss back on the map for the first time since Eli Manning was wrapping up his college career in Oxford. The Illinois native lived up to his billing as a rookie, earning SEC Freshman of the Year honors after finishing with 72 catches for 608 yards and five touchdowns. Treadwell was well on his way to besting those last two marks as a sophomore and was in the middle of enjoying the best game of his career (to that point) when he was bent back awkwardly just outside the end zone following a run-and-catch near the end of the third quarter of an early November game against Auburn in 2014. He was eventually diagnosed with a fractured fibula and dislocated ankle and missed the final four games of the season.
The gruesome injury turned out to be a minor obstacle for Treadwell, who went from describing how his foot felt like it was "on fire" in the early days of his rehab to taking a wide receiver "master class" from NFL Hal-of-Fame WR James Lofton roughly seven months after the injury. The Rebels' all-time leading pass-catcher polished off his three-year college stay with a stellar junior campaign, leading the SEC in receiving yards (1,153) and touchdown catches (11) while finishing third in the conference with 82 catches.

NFL Player Comp(s): A poor man's DeAndre Hopkins

Best Scheme Fit: West Coast. While his speed and suddenness limitations shouldn't keep him from being productive in just about any offense, they would likely prohibit him from maximizing his potential. An offense that allows him to use his size and physicality on short and intermediate routes consistently - much like Keenan Allen - might just be the thing for him to live up to his first-round grade.

Strengths
•Shows rare instinctual field presence and understands the concept of leaving space between himself and the sideline on downfield throws.

•Hands-catcher with exceptional hand-eye coordination and long arms who tracks the ball well in the air and on over-the-shoulder passes; also excels on high-point throws.

•Unafraid to work the middle of the field and fights for extra yards; possesses a potent stiff arm while combining physicality and impressive vision to generate yards after the catch.

•Dominant blocker in the run game, routinely comes off his block at the right time in order to peel back and eliminate another defender pursuing the ball carrier.

•Comfortable in the slot as well as on the outside.

•Ball security: fumbled only once on 202 receptions over his college career (on the painful injury mentioned earlier).

Weaknesses
•Plays faster than his timed speed, but he does not boast breakaway speed and his ability to win deep is almost entirely dependent on size and high-point ability.

•Solid hands overall but did suffer a few more focus drops on occasion (more in 2015 than in previous years).

•Lacks suddenness, causing him to struggle to gain separation and making most of his catches on short and intermediate throws contested ones.

•Needs to rely less on physicality and more on crispness on his routes; possesses the mental aptitude to learn a NFL route tree quickly but may start slow initially after running a limited route tree in college.

•Worst games in 2015 came against LSU (struggled in press coverage against future NFL CB Tre'Davious White) and Florida (featuring 2016 first-round CB Vernon Hargreaves III).

Bottom Line
If the eyes are the windows into the soul of a man, then a receiver's willingness to block might be the best indicator as to the level of desire he has to be great. The fact Treadwell's blocking prowess is mentioned first isn't meant as a knock on his ability to do what receivers are supposed to do - catch the ball - but rather just how important blocking is to him and how much it jumps out on tape. After initially comparing Treadwell to Jordan Matthews and Allen, I settled on Hopkins due to how ridiculously close the two are/were physically and athletically coming out for the draft: Hopkins was 6-1 and 214 pounds with 4.57 speed, a 36-inch vertical and a broad jump just shy of 10 feet - all very close to what Treadwell churned out at the NFL Combine and/or his pro day - and was credited for outstanding ball skills while at Clemson. The biggest differences I see between the two is that Hopkins was quicker and more slippery off the line of scrimmage while Treadwell relies more on size before the catch and physicality after it. There's a reason I included "poor man's" in front of Hopkins' name earlier: "Nuk" was able to consistently create separation and more explosive - two areas in which Treadwell will not be able to improve all that much.

And this is where I'll circle back to Allen, who has emerged as a star receiver despite not possessing elite measurables. I don't question whether or not Treadwell can become a lead receiver in the NFL, but unlike Hopkins, I don't believe he's the type of wideout that will produce with a league-average starter at quarterback. In other words, he will probably require an above-average passer in order to become an above-average receiver. That conclusion doesn't mean he isn't worth a first-day pick, but it does suggest he should go in the back half of the first round as opposed to the front half.


Doug Orth has written for FF Today since 2006 and been featured in USA Today’s Fantasy Football Preview magazine since 2010. He hosted USA Today’s hour-long, pre-kickoff fantasy football internet chat every Sunday in 2012-13 and appears as a guest analyst on a number of national sports radio shows, including Sirius XM’s “Fantasy Drive”. Doug is also a member of the Fantasy Sports Writers Association.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Kudos on the Bottom line on this article Doug.

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I chose Starks as my #4 Rb over 2 rookies and one other importrant cuff. My reasoning was simple and I feel real in a fantasy sense. He has a role regardless of injury. It might not be enhanced like last season, due to fattness from a stable mate, but it is a role that does not need injury to be realized. They trust Starks in key situations in both the passing game and redzone area to get the job done. IF Lacy were to still not seem right this season, he will improve on last years number, in which he lead the team in yards from scrimmage with 1,000 yards on 43 receptions with 5 Td's. Not to be overlooked is Lacy played in 15 games last year, combined for 950 yards from scrimmage, on 20 catches, and 5 Td's . I believe they re-signed James in the off season also.

 

I will elaborate on the other 3 in consideration when they are all picked.

 

Derrick Henry was just picked and he was a BIG consideration here. DeMarco Murray is literally fighting for his life after the debacle last season, and he is being paid well. Henry has what I takes to be the lead back,I just don't know, short of injury, what that role will be. Mularkey's track record shows the two will split carries. More career upside in Henry than Starks for sure. I just feel that I know what I'm getting this season in Starks

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11.10 Eric Ebron

 

I like his potential much more than the Witten's and Miller's this year. I know...............he has always had a shitload of potential, but now without Megatron I think he may get more targets. As a TE2, he was who I was targeting although I would have preferred Allen over Ebron.

 

I was considering Winston, but Jeff took care of that decision for me. And, with 2 guys behind me each needing a TE2, now was the time to pounce on Ebron!

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A Smart guy at FFT wrote this one. His yac is fine and a plus. Dude was made, and hand selected to play in this offense with this Qb.

 

NFL Draft Profile – WR Laquon Treadwell

4/12/16

 

 

 

 

Editor's note: Predict the top ten picks of the NFL Draft for a chance to win FFToday prizes. Enter our NFL Draft Contest now.

 

Laquon Treadwell

With the skills to be a lead NFL receiver, Laquon Treadwell should go in the back half of the first round.

 

Vitals

College: Ole Miss

Height/Weight: 6’2”/221

Hands: 9 1/2”

 

Important NFL Combine Numbers

40-Yard Dash: 4.63 (Pro Day)

Vertical Jump: 33"

Broad Jump: 9' 9"

20-Yard Shuttle: DNP

3-Cone: DNP

 

Background (College Stats)

Rated as a five-star recruit and the nation's top receiver by multiple services, Treadwell - along with fellow draft classmate DT Robert Nkemdiche - headlined an impressive 2013 class of freshmen that put Ole Miss back on the map for the first time since Eli Manning was wrapping up his college career in Oxford. The Illinois native lived up to his billing as a rookie, earning SEC Freshman of the Year honors after finishing with 72 catches for 608 yards and five touchdowns. Treadwell was well on his way to besting those last two marks as a sophomore and was in the middle of enjoying the best game of his career (to that point) when he was bent back awkwardly just outside the end zone following a run-and-catch near the end of the third quarter of an early November game against Auburn in 2014. He was eventually diagnosed with a fractured fibula and dislocated ankle and missed the final four games of the season.

The gruesome injury turned out to be a minor obstacle for Treadwell, who went from describing how his foot felt like it was "on fire" in the early days of his rehab to taking a wide receiver "master class" from NFL Hal-of-Fame WR James Lofton roughly seven months after the injury. The Rebels' all-time leading pass-catcher polished off his three-year college stay with a stellar junior campaign, leading the SEC in receiving yards (1,153) and touchdown catches (11) while finishing third in the conference with 82 catches.

 

NFL Player Comp(s): A poor man's DeAndre Hopkins

 

Best Scheme Fit: West Coast. While his speed and suddenness limitations shouldn't keep him from being productive in just about any offense, they would likely prohibit him from maximizing his potential. An offense that allows him to use his size and physicality on short and intermediate routes consistently - much like Keenan Allen - might just be the thing for him to live up to his first-round grade.

 

Strengths

•Shows rare instinctual field presence and understands the concept of leaving space between himself and the sideline on downfield throws.

 

•Hands-catcher with exceptional hand-eye coordination and long arms who tracks the ball well in the air and on over-the-shoulder passes; also excels on high-point throws.

 

•Unafraid to work the middle of the field and fights for extra yards; possesses a potent stiff arm while combining physicality and impressive vision to generate yards after the catch.

 

•Dominant blocker in the run game, routinely comes off his block at the right time in order to peel back and eliminate another defender pursuing the ball carrier.

 

•Comfortable in the slot as well as on the outside.

 

•Ball security: fumbled only once on 202 receptions over his college career (on the painful injury mentioned earlier).

 

Weaknesses

•Plays faster than his timed speed, but he does not boast breakaway speed and his ability to win deep is almost entirely dependent on size and high-point ability.

 

•Solid hands overall but did suffer a few more focus drops on occasion (more in 2015 than in previous years).

 

•Lacks suddenness, causing him to struggle to gain separation and making most of his catches on short and intermediate throws contested ones.

 

•Needs to rely less on physicality and more on crispness on his routes; possesses the mental aptitude to learn a NFL route tree quickly but may start slow initially after running a limited route tree in college.

 

•Worst games in 2015 came against LSU (struggled in press coverage against future NFL CB Tre'Davious White) and Florida (featuring 2016 first-round CB Vernon Hargreaves III).

 

Bottom Line

If the eyes are the windows into the soul of a man, then a receiver's willingness to block might be the best indicator as to the level of desire he has to be great. The fact Treadwell's blocking prowess is mentioned first isn't meant as a knock on his ability to do what receivers are supposed to do - catch the ball - but rather just how important blocking is to him and how much it jumps out on tape. After initially comparing Treadwell to Jordan Matthews and Allen, I settled on Hopkins due to how ridiculously close the two are/were physically and athletically coming out for the draft: Hopkins was 6-1 and 214 pounds with 4.57 speed, a 36-inch vertical and a broad jump just shy of 10 feet - all very close to what Treadwell churned out at the NFL Combine and/or his pro day - and was credited for outstanding ball skills while at Clemson. The biggest differences I see between the two is that Hopkins was quicker and more slippery off the line of scrimmage while Treadwell relies more on size before the catch and physicality after it. There's a reason I included "poor man's" in front of Hopkins' name earlier: "Nuk" was able to consistently create separation and more explosive - two areas in which Treadwell will not be able to improve all that much.

 

And this is where I'll circle back to Allen, who has emerged as a star receiver despite not possessing elite measurables. I don't question whether or not Treadwell can become a lead receiver in the NFL, but unlike Hopkins, I don't believe he's the type of wideout that will produce with a league-average starter at quarterback. In other words, he will probably require an above-average passer in order to become an above-average receiver. That conclusion doesn't mean he isn't worth a first-day pick, but it does suggest he should go in the back half of the first round as opposed to the front half.

 

 

Doug Orth has written for FF Today since 2006 and been featured in USA Today’s Fantasy Football Preview magazine since 2010. He hosted USA Today’s hour-long, pre-kickoff fantasy football internet chat every Sunday in 2012-13 and appears as a guest analyst on a number of national sports radio shows, including Sirius XM’s “Fantasy Drive”. Doug is also a member of the Fantasy Sports Writers Association.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Kudos on the Bottom line on this article Doug.

Where did ya go Jeff?

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I'm not buying the hype on Thomas yet. Still great spot to get him though. He usually goes earlier.

Thanks.

 

With my cadre of WR2 and WR3 types, I'm going to need the occasional splash game I think he will provide. I have another trick or two up my sleeve at WR and wouldn't be terribly surprised if my all four of my WRs so far end up in the top 40.

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11.12 C. Clay solid backup TE with Starter potential, 12.01 I'm thrilled to have Matt Ryan as a QB2 I think he ha a nice solid year and plays much better then last season

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A lot of QBs have gone off the board recently and since I have to draft two I figured I better grab one now. Stafford may not be high on a lot of people's boards because of the loss of Megtron but I think that makes him a steal. The offense was much better with the new OC and since I don't think they will be very good overall I expect them to be throwing the ball a lot in games they are behind in. Stafford has always thrown the ball a lot and Tate was great with him when Megatron was hurt a couple years ago.

 

Tyrod was there but I'm not sold on him. I'm not sure the Bills are even sold on him. Dalton would've been my other pick but I'm not sure what their offense will be like with their new OC. Stafford seemed to be the best option. Regardless, it was my back up QB so I didn't stress too much over it.

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Dang QB is pretty deep. I forgot all about Carr and Winston in the past couple of rounds. I may have scooped up one of those in retrospect.

 

I was thinking of a fallback of the Romo-Ryan-Stafford variety. Still a couple worth while options on the board IMO.

 

Regarding Tanny, it always perplexs me a little bit when I see 2 WRs fly of the board in the first 5 rounds of a draft but no one wants to touch their qb.

 

Gase, plus up tempo might make him better this year. We say that every year right? :)

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Dang QB is pretty deep. I forgot all about Carr and Winston in the past couple of rounds. I may have scooped up one of those in retrospect.

 

I was thinking of a fallback of the Romo-Ryan-Stafford variety. Still a couple worth while options on the board IMO.

 

Regarding Tanny, it always perplexs me a little bit when I see 2 WRs fly of the board in the first 5 rounds of a draft but no one wants to touch their qb.

 

Gase, plus up tempo might make him better this year. We say that every year right? :)

 

And every year a team has a great WR or two for fantasy football yet some how the QB is terrible. Strange but happens a lot.

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Dang QB is pretty deep. I forgot all about Carr and Winston in the past couple of rounds. I may have scooped up one of those in retrospect.

 

I was thinking of a fallback of the Romo-Ryan-Stafford variety. Still a couple worth while options on the board IMO.

 

Regarding Tanny, it always perplexs me a little bit when I see 2 WRs fly of the board in the first 5 rounds of a draft but no one wants to touch their qb.

 

Gase, plus up tempo might make him better this year. We say that every year right? :)

The 4000+ passing attempts is key also. Tannehill has flirted right at the top 12 mark and was a QB #2 target of mine. The worst thing that has happened in Miami is the loss of Lamar.

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Treadwell was tops on my want list this round, might target him earlier in looming drafts....

Also hoped to have funchess, Benjamin was Hugh on my list but wanted the others more. Hoping rivers has a few years left and can make this cat more than he really is ala the Eddie royal principle

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Treadwell was tops on my want list this round, might target him earlier in looming drafts....

Also hoped to have funchess, Benjamin was Hugh on my list but wanted the others more. Hoping rivers has a few years left and can make this cat more than he really is ala the Eddie royal principle

 

Benjamin was picked 10.07.

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I hope he comes back soon.............

 

Looks like he or somebody deleted the selection.

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Ahhhhh never expected someone to overpay THAT much for benjamin, did not look back gar enouhg, I will fix it

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:crosses fingers: did not see him taken, can't imagine people over paying for him

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Ahhhhh never expected someone to overpay THAT much for benjamin, did not look back gar enouhg, I will fix it

 

No worries, I did it twice already this draft. Just shows how different all of our draft lists are. For instance, you took LaFell in the 12th and I don't even have him on my draft list.

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No worries, I did it twice already this draft. Just shows how different all of our draft lists are. For instance, you took LaFell in the 12th and I don't even have him on my draft list.

In the June draft we have a rosters and a round by round thread, helps limit mistakes, I swear by that model....lol

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In the June draft we have a rosters and a round by round thread, helps limit mistakes, I swear by that model....lol

 

?? There's a specific thread for this link. Rosters, round by round, etc.

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Benji was also a pick for me to kind of handcuff Allen.

 

I may have one of the vikings WRs higher overall potentially but unsure which one.

 

 

In the end though I'll side with the better QB on a team more likely to be passing and playing catch up.

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I just checked his FFC ADP which is currently listed as 9.12.

 

I may be a touch higher on him than consensus overall but I don't think I nabbed him any earlier than should be expected.

 

It's preference between a lot of these guys.

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Joshypoo Furgeson, also known as Josh Furgeson, is an USGA out of IL. The Colts can't stop talking about how much they love this kid and they originally had a 4th round grade on him. I can easily see him being this year's Duke Johnson if the Colts really do want their own small pass catching back like they have been saying.

 

Plus there is an added bonus of playing behind the ancient Frank Gore. He is a sweet add to my backfield.

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